A fan's observations on the Washington Nationals, from across the virtual divide.

Will History Repeat Itself?

I make an effort not to put myself in the position to be an armchair General Manager. I figure that there are probably fifty people in the world who are qualified to be a Major League GM, and I am not one of them. For me to comment would be a little like me commenting on major surgery – Take that spleen out! You can live without a spleen, right?

But there are aspects of being a GM that isn’t about evaluating talent or negotiating contracts.

One of them is, what happens when one (or more) of the Nationals’ prospects ends up playing themselves onto the big club’s roster?

The gaudy (in a bad way) start of spring training is setting up the scenario where it is entirely possible that a player like Ian Desmond or Drew Storen so handily outperforms the incumbent that Mike Rizzo’s biggest April worry is what to do with Cristian Guzman and Jason Bergmann. It wasn’t so long ago – 2008 – that this very scenario played out as Jesus Flores played himself onto the big team’s roster, even when his ticket seemed irrevocably punched for AAA.

Back in November, I traveled to Arizona for Arizona Fall League, and I interviewed Drew Storen about his plans for spring training. At that time, he said his plan was to come to Florida and make an impact. While he’s had only one appearance so far, it was notable for both its success and brevity. He’ll pitch again tomorrow – and while his appearance may be overshadowed by Stephen Strasburg, a strong performance will almost certainly get the attention of the front office. An impact, indeed.

Ian Desmond is doing the same thing… and as a position player, he’s getting a chance every other day or so to show that perhaps Syracuse isn’t the place for him.

The problem that Rizzo faces is that the business of baseball – assigning players to the minors in order to both foster their development and slow down the arbitration clock – seems to be in conflict with the actual performance of the players. I suspect it is tempting to not let a player’s emprical performance on the field interfere with a perfectly good business decision. But the fans don’t see it that way, and people like me are rooting for Drew Storen and Ian Desmond.

I am not saying that Storen or Desmond… or any other Nationals rookie… deserves to make the team. What I am saying is, if they have game, they don’t deserve to ride the bus in the minors because the Nats have expensive contracts with veterans. The fans don’t deserve it, either. I think we deserve the best available team… and I think that the take home message from 2009 is that  it is a mistake to assume that any player on the team is a lock at his position on the first day of spring training (see Milledge, Lastings). Albert Pujols comes to spring training believing he needs to earn his spot. It seems to work out for him.

So will history repeat itself?

Let’s hope!

One Pitch

Filed under: Games,Players — Tags: , , , , — Wigi @ 7:47 pm May 1, 2009

There were two outs in the top of the first inning. Jordan Zimmerman had made quick work of the first two batters, and now faced Albert Pujols. Zimmermann fell behind 3-1. He released the pitch, and a moment later, the baseball was rattling around blue seats just below the MASN “Nats Extra” studio in left field.

Now I know that a lot of my impression of what was going on in the game has to do with what the commentators are saying. But I swear, the impression I got from that pitch was Jordan Zimmermann’s way of introducing himself to Pujols.

“Hey, I’m Jordan Zimmermann… I’m not afraid of you.”

“Hey, I’m Albert Pujols.”

Last night’s game was different from a lot of the Nats games this season, because the Nats just plain got beat. The better team won.

And you know, I can live with that. As rocky as the start was for Zimmermann, he had his moments, too. Chico Harlan quotes Manny Acta in his late Nationals Journal post about how the metric by which one should judge this start for Zimmermann is how he reacted to the adversity.

I think he did fine.

The Cardinals are leading the National League for a reason. The Nats are in last place for a reason. Last night’s game is about the outcome you’d expect.

Other notes:

  • Ryan Zimmerman extends his hitting streak to 20 games.
  • Three baserunning gaffes in four games for Elijah Dukes. I am concerned.